Masterminds: It’s a Group Thing – The Importance of Sharing to Learn

There was a Cyclist, Sprinter, Swimmer and Footballer all sitting in a coffee shop – when the swimmer turned to the others and said, “So, what do we all have in common…?”

 

…No, this isn’t the build up to a bad Englishman, Irishman and Scotsman joke, rather a scene at a recent group brainstorming session we held.

It's a group thingThis is where a group of professional athletes and coaches come together to share where they are at with their mental training, and what has and hasn’t worked for them over the last 30 days.

This process, although sometimes logistically difficult is amazingly beneficial – and you may be surprised to see just how well these different sports play together!

In a previous post, we have discussed the use of journaling in the assessment and application phases of training and how it can analytically give you a clearer indication of just how well you are traveling and show you where the next move needs to be.

However, have you ever stopped and thought ‘I wonder just how well this works for everyone else?’, or ‘Do they get the same outcome as I do?’, or ‘Would another athlete have these strong emotional reactions over the same thing?’

Being able to bounce thoughts off sporting peers, and share ideas or experiences from different sports, is a key aspect to building social proof and supporting our own personal belief system.

An area coaches may neglect to include in their development strategy is the psychological and emotional need for ongoing social proof in the individual or team. As much as these athletes and coaches would like to have you think they are maverick in their approach, they can be far more tentative and traditional in reality.

Whilst the application may be as different as each sport, or as individual as a single person, the ability to build social proof through contributing to these brainstorming sessions is a key factor in sustainably imbedding neural and physical skill systems.

Another benefit is the belief you are actively contributing to your own development and career. This helps nurture personal ownership of the process and develops sustainable forward motivation.

So as a coach, what do you do to ‘sell’ your clients on the big picture in your approach to their neural and emotional performance – and are they buying in, or just turning up?

The unknown is an unnerving place for anyone to be. No one likes loosing control of their performance, nor do they like processes being done to them. So it makes no sense to keep them in the dark nor does it work.

Rather, they want to feel they have a handle on their sporting trajectory, are involved in integrating these neural improvements and are an intricate part of the whole.

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